The Best Free-Entry International Photography Contests

(and 6 paid entry ones where the fees is less than 20$ or 1000 Rs.)

Free Entry:

  1. Sony World Photography Contest
  2. Nikon International Photo Contest
  3. Olympus Global Open Photo Contest
  4. NTU International Photography Awards
  5. Istanbul Photo Awards
  6. Alexia Foundation Grants
  7. Cortona On the Move Photo Contest
  8. Smithsonian Photo Awards
  9. Leica Oskar Barnack Award
  10. Comedy Wildlife Photo Contest
  11. Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year Awards

Paid (relatively cheap) Entry Fees:

  1. Gomma Grant
  2. National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest
  3. Pictures of the Year International Photo Contest
  4. Kuala Lumpur Photo Awards
  5. Travel Photographer of the Year Awards
  6. Big Picture, Natural World Photography Contest
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Street art, Berlin

Photos from Bangladesh: A Campaign with World Vision Canada

Sophia Hsin

bangladesh_no_child_for_sale_world_vision-16An afternoon on the streets of Dhaka

I remember my first day waking up in Dhaka. The world’s most densely populated city with 14 million people—a city filled with blaring horns, faded concrete walls, the smell of dust, curry and the sound of prayer call five times a day.

I had partnered with World Vision Canada on their No Child For Sale campaign where we would visit area development projects in the slums of Bangladesh, visit communities deep in the country, dive into gathering resources on child labour issues involved in the supply chain and how it leads back to consumers in Canada.

I remember visiting countless night schools, interviewing five year olds that worked as waste pickers on garbage mountains and meeting children with stories that seemed too brutal to exist. Along the way, I was also cared for by staff that treated me like family and meet people…

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Balloon Seller

Barely five

Spunk, fifteen

and the wit, fifty

The balloons he carries

bobbing on the ends of sticks

like his head

on the pike carved by poverty

he manages to keep it upright

but they push him down

seldom bullied

but ignored

not worth the effort

lowest of the low

a mere fruit fly

in a world of leeches

craving better blood.

 

His father showed him

everything he shouldn’t be

but he became anyway

the cycle destined to repeat

forever set on a loop

the rich get richer

the rest get wearier.

 

And once more he chants

“bhaiyya, le lo na ek”

“behen, oh behen, de do na kuch”

and once more he sees

how they unsee him

and one last time

he disappears

into the river

his balloons bobbing

in the water

but his head

nowhere to be seen.

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To Pauline Wong

Do
A deer
you taught me
how to stretch
my fingers around
crotchets and minims
how to read
clefs and breves

Re
A drop
I pause and begin
at the tap of your foot
the rap on my knuckles
the metronome stands
nothing but a symbol

Mi
A name
you gave me
patience in semibreves
happiness in quavers
fleeting semiquavers
and I showed off
with the demisemis

Fa
A long long way
we exist in two timezones
You said one day
we’ll watch an orchestra
together at the Esplanade
I still wait for that day

So
A needle
I, the thread
that you tried so hard
my fingers to unknot
“Octopus hand”
you say when my wrist
raises itself as I attempt
to reach beyond an octave

La
A note
you play
for me to sing
the examiner must
be impressed
I must not tarnish
your repute
But Aural always
took me over

Ti
A drink
one day we’ll share
when I find you again
It’s been seven years
and counting
but you’ll always be
the one that taught me
how to practice
how to feel
how to be
my art

And you will bring me back to
Do

No one knows me like the piano
in my mother’s home
– Sampha

thepianist